Sunday, July 21, 2019

Concert Review: Ehud Ettun and Henrique Eisenmann at the 1900 Building

The Brazilian pianist Henrique Eisenmann told an audience of 60 at the 1900 Building on Saturday, July 13, that he and the Israeli bassist Ehud Ettun were acting as “musical archeologists.”  A $26 charge at the door funded the sonic dig.

True to Eisenmann’s word, the duo unearthed music from around the globe.  They breathed new life into Russian folk, Kansas City bebop, Bulgarian chant, Brazilian samba and a Ghanese children’s song.  A cover of Green Day’s “Basket Case” was the least esoteric selection of the 80-minute outing.  After applying a Thelonious Monk-style adaptation to the 1994 pop-punk hit, Eisenmann tossed up devil horns.

Eisenberg dedicated the performance to the concept of “dialogue” and insisted that “music helps us learn to listen.”  When improvised music is as full of surprises and artistic mastery as Sunday’s riveting showcase, attentive listening is as rewarding as it is edifying.

Plastic Sax also reviewed the duo’s 2018 concert at the same venue.

(Original image by Plastic Sax.)

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Now's the Time: The Project H


The Project H performs at The Ship on Thursday, July 18.  Links to Plastic Sax reviews of three of the Kansas City band’s albums are here.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Confirmation: Weekly News & Notes

*According to event organizer Lori Chandler, the Musicians for Molly benefit at Mod Gallery on Sunday, July 14, raised more than $20,000.

*Matt Otto is profiled by an in-house publication of the University of Kansas.

*The offerings of the 2019 edition of the Charlie Parker Celebration organized by KC Jazz Alive include a concert featuring locally based musicians at Liberty Performing Arts Theatre on August 23. 

*Tweet o’ the Week: Jazzy 88 WFSK- Tune-in on Thusdays to hear WFSK'S Artist of the Week! This week's Artist of the Week is Bassists Julian Vaughn, his new release is entitled "Supreme"! Although the bass is often associated with funk, Vaughn likes to play with more of a finesse style as well as some funk.

*From a press release: Join the American Jazz Museum for an entire month of programming celebrating Charlie “Bird” Parker… Charlie Parker’s plastic Grafton Saxophone, played in the now famous 1953 Jazz at Massey Hall concert, is on display in the Museum’s permanent exhibit. This August, the American Jazz Museum presents four free unique public programs, exhibits, and performances honoring Parker’s legacy.  Charlie Parker: Ready, Set, Bird! - Friday, Aug. 2nd; Charlie Parker: Bird’s The Word - Friday, Aug. 16th; Charlie Parker: Expectations of Bird - Saturday, Aug. 24th; Charlie Parker: Bird’s Fixings - Thursday, August 29th. Details are here.

(Original image by Plastic Sax.)

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Concert Review: Ryan Keberle & Catharsis at the National World War I Museum and Memorial

At the conclusion of the free concert by Ryan Keberle & Catharsis at the J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial on Monday, July 8, an exasperated man seated near me griped that the performance was “out there.”  I beg to differ. 

Perhaps recognizing that a significant portion of the audience of about 100 were museum loyalists rather than jazz fans, the critically acclaimed touring musicians- positive notices by Will Layman and Giovanni Russonello were published in the days following Monday’s concert- played far more conservatively that at their recent appearances at Mod Gallery (Plastic Sax review) and Black Dolphin (Plastic Sax review).

The concert was billed as a tribute to James Reese Europe.  Yet the five musicians played only one selection associated with the lamentably unheralded bandleader.  Trombonist and electronics manipulator Keberle, saxophonist and trumpeter (and recent addition to the band) Scott Robinson, guitarist and vocalist Camila Meza, bassist Matt Clohesy and drummer Eric Doob offered a straightforward interpretation of W.C. Handy’s “Memphis Blues.”

A reading of Duke Ellington’s “I Like the Sunrise” featuring a gorgeous vocal turn from Meza was similarly conventional.  The final half of the show was devoted to a Langston Hughes-inspired suite from Catharsis’ new album The Hope I Hold.  Hughes’ poetry sometimes made for cumbersome lyrics, but the instrumental segments featuring astounding statements from Robinson and Meza thrilled jazz hounds even as they baffled some of the history buffs in the audience.

(Original image by Plastic Sax.)

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Now's the Time: Ehud Ettun


Israeli bassist Ehud Ettun performs the title track of his new trio album Deep in the Mountains in the embedded video.  Ettun and the Brazilian pianist Henrique Eisenmann return to the 1900 Building on Saturday, July 13.  Plastic Sax raved about the duo’s 2018 concert in Mission Woods, Kansas.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Confirmation: Weekly News & Notes

*Yoko Takemura recounts the backstory of the release of Jay McShann’s new Live in Tokyo album for Jazz Tokyo.

*Selections by Karrin Allyson, Peter Schlamb and Bobby Watson and were highlighted in an episode of the weekly radio program Eight One Sixty titled “Best Albums of the Decade.”

*Julian Vaughn’s Supreme debuted at #6 on Billboard’s jazz albums chart.

*A quartet led by vocalist Kelly Gant performed on Star Sessions.  Gant is among the artists on the bill at a fundraiser for Molly Hammer at Mod Gallery on Sunday, July 14.

*Chris Burnett is featured on page 130 of the latest issue of KC Studio magazine.

*Brad Allen and Herschel McWilliams were interviewed by Joe Dimino.

*An essayist proposes that Robert Altman’s “films are a true reflection of the Kansas style Jazz that he grew up with in his hometown.”

*Tweet o’ the Week: Sabrina Moella- 10. But back to the show, the whole band was excellent. Kristopher Funn on bass, Lawrence Fields on piano, Corey Fonville on drums, Chief aTunde Adjuah himself on trompet, Logan Richardson on the sax & Weedie Braimah on djembe. Chile. That's a jazz band dream team right there.

(Original image by Plastic Sax.)

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Album Review: Julian Vaughn- Supreme

The gentle rumble of Julian Vaughn’s bass during the initial moments of “On Notice,” one of the curative tracks on his new album Supreme, feels as refreshing as air conditioning on a sweltering summer day.  As with temperature control, the smooth jazz crafted by the Kansas City musician is intended to enhance life rather than serve as its primary focus.  Not only are the eleven selections on Supreme designed to make pleasant moments even more gratifying, they’re capable of dispersing worry.  Even Vaughn’s strong pop orientation on an arrangement of After 7’s 1990 slow jam “Ready or Not” hums unobtrusively in the background like an efficient central air system.

(Original image by Plastic Sax.)